Health facility determinants and trends of ICD-10 outpatient psychiatric consultations across Sofala, Mozambique: time-series analyses from 2012 to 2014

Publication Date:

23 Sep 2015

Citation:

Wagenaar BH, Cumbe V, Raunig-Berho M, Rao D, Napua M, Hughes JP, et al. (2015). Health facility determinants and trends of ICD-10 outpatient psychiatric consultations across Sofala, Mozambique: time-series analyses from 2012 to 2014. BMC Psychiatry. 15(227). doi: 10.1186/s12888-015-0609-4

 

Abstract

Background
Few peer-reviewed publications have taken a longitudinal or systems approach to mental healthcare (MH) utilization in low- and middle-income countries. We analyzed: (1) outpatient ICD-10 diagnoses over time and by gender; and (2) health facility determinants of MH service utilization.

Methods
We reviewed a census of 15,856 outpatient psychiatric consultations conducted at Ministry clinics in Sofala province, Mozambique from January 2012-June 2014. Generalized estimating equations were used to model facility determinants of ICD-10 diagnoses.

Results
Across the period, 48.9 % of consults were for epilepsy, 22.4 % for schizophrenia/delusional disorders, and 8.8 % for neurotic/stress-related disorders. The proportion of schizophrenia/delusional disorders has decreased over time (32 % in 2012; 13 % in 2014, p = 0.003), in favor of greater diversity of diagnoses. Epilepsy has increased significantly in absolute and proportional terms. Women are more likely to present for neurotic/stress-related conditions (12.8 % of consults for women, 5.7 % for men, p < 0.001), while men are more likely to present for substance use (1.9 % for women, 6.4 % for men, p < 0.001). Clinics with more psychiatric technicians have a 2.1-fold (CI: 1.2, 3.6) increased rate of schizophrenia/delusional disorder diagnoses. Rural clinics saw a higher proportion of epilepsy cases and a lower proportion of organic, substance use, schizophrenia, and mood disorder cases.

Discussion and Conclusions
Outpatient MH service provision is increasing in Mozambique, although currently focuses on epilepsy and schizophrenia/delusional disorders. Mid-level psychiatric providers appear to be associated with a higher proportion of schizophrenia/delusional disorder diagnoses. Due to diagnostic or utilization differences, rural clinics may be missing important cases of organic, substance use, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Models and decision-support tools for mental healthcare integration with primary care practice are needed in Mozambique to allow further scale-up of mental health services.

 

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